Category: Registry


This tutorial is for all Internet Explorer users who would like to change where their downloaded files are saved by default. Read below to find out how you can edit your download folder for Internet Explorer just by editing a data value.

The first thing you must do is open the “Registry Editor”, which can be opened by opening the “Run dialogue. The “Run” dialogue can be opened using the holding the “Windows” key and then pressing the “R” key. Once the “Run” dialogue has opened you must enter into the text box within the dialogue window the text below:

regedit

 

Once you have entered the above text into the text box within the “Run” dialogue you must then hit the “Enter” button. The “Registry Editor” window will now open.

 

You must search for a particular registry entry, which can be done by clicking the small “+” signs on the left of each of the folders in the left pane of the “registry Editor” window. You must navigate through the directories to the “Internet Explorer” folder as shown below:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER -> Software –> Microsoft -> Internet Explorer

 

Once you navigate to the “Internet Explorer” folder you must right the string on the right named “Download Directory”. The folder you must navigate to (circled in lower left) as well as the “Download Directory” string (circled on upper right) is shown in the screenshot below:

Editing the windows registry to change default download directory for windows internet explorer

 

You must right click the “Download Directory” and then click the “Modify” text, which will bring up this dialogue box:

Editing the IE data value

 

As you can see in the screenshot above, my current default download location for files in Internet Explorer is blacked out for privacy reasons, although your current default save location will appear here and you may edit it to the directory of your choice. For example; if you wanted every file you downloaded to automatically be saved to the root of the “C” drive then you would edit the data in the text box below “Value data” text the text below:

C:\

 

By typing the above into the box and then clicking “OK” and closing the “Registry Editor”, your new default save location will be the root of the “C” drive (i.e. C:\). Your default save location is now set to the directory that you typed into the text box.

Congratulations, you just made using Microsoft Internet Explorer so much easier. Enjoy your newfound Microsoft Internet Explorer setting modification knowledge.

This tutorial is written for Windows XP users who are tired of the cliché “Recycle Bin” and would like to rename their trash folder to something unique. Read below to find out how you can rename the trash folder to anything you choose.

The first thing you must do is open the “Registry Editor”, which can be opened by holding the “Windows” key and then tapping the “R” key.

 

Once the “Registry Editor” is opened you must navigate to the location shown below:

HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT \ CLSID \ {645FF040-5081-101B-9F08-00AA002F954E}

 

Once you get to the location shown above, you will need to edit the value to whichever name you would like to appear in place of “Recycle Bin”, such as “Trash” or “Garbage Bin”. To edit the value you must right click the value named “LocalizedString” and then select “Modify” from the context menu that appears and then enter the preferred name and hit “Enter”

In case you do not yet understand the value you need to edit, it is circled in red in the screenshot below:

Recycle Bin Renaming

Once you have renamed the value and hit the “Enter” key, the value will be set and you can close the “Registry Editor” window by clicking the red “X” in the top right corner of the window.

 

After you have closed the “Registry Editor” window you can restart your computer to be absolutely certain that the change will fully take effect or you can continue using your computer normally (although your ”Recycle Bin” may still be named the same, until you restart).

Congratulations. You just modified the Windows XP registry to make it work for you by changing the default name of your trash folder. Enjoy your newfound Windows XP modification knowledge.

This tutorial shows you how to remove an irritating feature of Windows Vista, known as “Fast User Switching”. Using this feature just allows you to run multiple login account parallel to each other, although doing such will dramatically affect the performance of each of the logins. Overall, this is an unnecessary feature that can be disabled quickly and easily. Read below to find out how you can disable this feature in under a minute.

There are two methods used in order to disable this feature. The first method is below:

Method 1

 

The first thing you must do is open the “Run” dialogue. To do so, you must open the “start” button and then type into the “Search” bar the text below:

gpedit.msc

 

Once you have entered the text above, you must hit the “Enter” key. This will open the “Group Policy Editor” window. What you must do in this window is navigate to the location below:

Local Computer Policy –> Administrative Templates –> System –> Logon

 

Once you have navigated to the location above, you must set the option “Hide entry points for Fast User Switching” to “Enabled”.

 

Now, assuming the above settings worked on your specific version of Windows Vista, the ”Fast User Switching” option will now stop appearing in the Login UI (Login User Interface), the Task Manager and also the Windows “start” menu.

 

If the above method did not work then you may try the method below. The most common reason for the above method not working is the fact that certain versions of Windows Vista do not come with the “Group Policy Editor” software. If this is the case and the above method will not work then you should try the registry method below.

Method 2

 

In order to use the registry method to deactivate the “Fast User Switching” option, you must first open the Windows Vista registry. To do so you must hold the “Windows” key and then tap the “R” key once, doing this will open the “Run” dialogue, which you are about to use to open the “Registry Editor”.

 

Once the “Run” dialogue is open you must type the text below into the text box and then hit the “Enter” key or click the “OK” button:

regedit

 

Once you have entered the above text and hit the “Enter” key or clicked the “OK” button, you will now have an open “Registry Editor” window. The first thing you must do with this window is navigate to the location below:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \ SOFTWARE \ Microsoft \ Windows \ CurrentVersion \ Policies \ System

 

Now right click in an open, white space in the right window pane and select “New” and then select “DWORD Value” and name the value using the text exactly as shown below:

HideFastUserSwitching

 

Then change the value of the key to the following:

1

 

Once you have changed the value and hit enter, the value will now show “1”.

 

You can now close the “Registry Editor” by clicking the red “X” in the top right side of the window.

 

Now you must restart your computer for the changes to take effect (sometimes the feature will deactivate without having to restart, although it never hurts to restart just to be sure).

Well done, the feature will now be deactivated and you can enjoy your computer without the irritating “Fast User Switching” feature. Enjoy your newfound Windows Vista knowledge.

This tutorial is written for all of you computer users out there who hate Norton Antivirus but for some reason are forced by their computer system to use the Norton suite, as it will not let you uninstall it. Read below to learn how you can give Norton the boot and install the Antivirus program you have been waiting for.

The first step you are going to have to take towards removing all of Norton Antivirus’ countless traces throughout your computer in just a few simple steps, using the Windows “Registry Editor”.

 

The first thing you are going to have to  do is open the Windows “Registry Editor”. This can be opened by using the “Win + R” (press and hold the Windows key and then tap the "R” key) key combination, which will open the “Run” window.

 

Now that you have opened the “Registry Editor” you will need to navigate to the “Software” folders throughout the Windows registry and then delete everything related to “Norton” within each of the “Software” folders.

 

The first “Software” folder that you need to remove “Norton/Symantec” from, is the folder in the directory below:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER/Software/(your Norton/Symantec directory here)

 

The folder shown above is also depicted in the screenshot below:

Removing Norton

 

The second and last “Software” folder that you need to remove “Norton/Symantec” from, is the directory shown below:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/SOFTWARE/(your Norton/Symantec directory here)

 

The folder shown above is also depicted on the screenshot below:

Software folder

 

You will now be able to install another antivirus software as well as be certain that your computer is now completely free of the Norton/Symantec software that was once installed on your computer. Feel free to head down to the local tech store and collect a new antivirus suite, or perhaps visit an online marketplace to pick up your new antivirus software.

Congratulations! You have just removed the most useless antivirus program from your computer and are now completely ready to install your brand new, state of the art antivirus suite. I recommend McAfee, I have had years of experience with this antivirus software and it has not yet let me down. Enjoy your newfound software removal knowledge.

This tutorial is written for all of you Windows users out there who find it very irritating having to press that “Num Lock” key EVERY time you try to enter a number using the numerical pad. Read below to find out how you can make the “Num Lock” key activate automatically as soon as you turn on your computer.

The first step you are going to have to take is to open the Windows registry editor. This can be opened by using the “Win + R” (press and hold the Windows key and then tap the "R” key) key combination, which will open the “Run” window. Once you have opened the “Run” window, you must enter the text highlighted below, into the text box of the “Run” window:

regedit

 

Once you have entered the text highlighted above into the “Run” window’s text box, you must hit the “Enter” key on your keyboard. Doing this will open your computer’s “Registry Editor”, which you are going to use to allow tell the “Num Lock” key to turn on as soon as you turn on your PC.

 

Now that your “Registry Editor” Window is open you must navigate through the registry keys, using the folder tree on the left of the screen. In order to navigate to the registry key that will tell the “Num Lock” key to turn on automatically, you must use the expand the following registry folders by clicking the “+” sign next to the following registry folders and then their corresponding subfolder in the order shown below:

1.   HKEY_CURRENT_USER

2.           Control Panel

3.                     Keyboard

 

If you do not understand the instructions highlighted above, you may use the screenshots below to make sense of what exactly you should be expanding:

Registry Editing - Num Lock On Boot

 

Once you have expanded the folders and subfolders in the order shown above, you must click onto the title of the “Keyboard” folder, which will display you with the values shown in the screenshot above, which are (in case you can’t see them clearly) as follows:

Name Type Data
(Default) REG_SZ (value not set)
InitialKeyboardIndicators REG_SZ 2
KeyboardDelay REG_SZ 1
KeyboardSpeed REG_SZ 31

 

In order to enable the automatic “Num Lock” on feature, you must edit the “InitialKeyboardIndicators” value to the number “2”. Just as I have done in the screen shot above.

 

Once you have done this, restart your computer and your automatic “Num Lock” feature will now be activated.

Congratulations, you just worked around the many complications of enabling the “Num Lock” key on startup in Windows. Enjoy your newfound Windows Registry editing knowledge.

This tutorial explains how you can backup the Windows XP registry in just minutes, which will one day save you hours, or perhaps days if you are infected with a virus or a harddrive is damaged. Read below to find out how easily you can backup your entire registry to a single, convenient file.

The first thing you will need to do to begin backing up your registry is to open the “Registry Editor”. To do this you must use the “Win + R” (Windows key + “R” key) key combination. Using this key combination will open the “Run” dialogue, which you are going to use to open the “Registry Editor”. The “Run” dialogue will appear like so:

Regedit

 

You will need to type into the text box (circled in red in the above screenshot) the text below:

regedit

 

Once you have typed the text above into the text box of the “Run” dialogue, you must click the “OK” button or hit the “Enter” key. Once you have done so, the “Registry Editor” will open and should appear like so:

Registry Editor

 

Now that you have opened the “Registry Editor” you can now backup your registry. To do so you must click the “File” button in the toolbar at the top of the window, in the top-left corner. In the context menu that appears when you click the “File” button in the toolbar, you must click the “Export” button.

 

After you have clicked the “Export” button you will be presented with a “Save” dialogue, of which you must enter the preferred name and save location for your registry backup file into. I recommend saving the file as something easy to recognize, such as “Registry Backup dd-mm-yyyy” or something similar. Once you have entered the name for your file, you must click “Save”.

 

Now, it is recommended that you make copies of this .reg (registry backup) file to a safe place, such as burned to a CD/DVD or copied to a portable storage device.

 

If you ever need to restore a .reg (registry backup) file then you must open the “Registry Editor” and select the “File” button from the toolbar, select “Import” and then select a .reg (registry backup) file that you backed up earlier and click the “Open” button to import your registry backup.

 

NOTE: Restoring a registry file can harm your computer, be sure that you are restoring a registry file suitable for your computer’s current configuration.

 

If you have followed the above tutorial correctly you will now have a registry just as it was at the time of the imported backup.

Be sure to make as many copies of your registry backup file as possible, as if you lose it there is very little chance you will be able to get it back in the exact condition it was at the time it was saved. Enjoy your new Windows registry knowledge.

This guide is written for all of you who want to change the boring old Windows XP tips, such as the “The Shut Down command on the Start menu enables you to safely shut down your computer.” tip. Read below to find out how you can change these tips to literally anything you want.

The first thing you will need to do in order to change the tips in Windows XP is to open the registry editor. To open the registry editor you need hit Win+R (Windows key + r key) in order to open the “Run” dialogue. When you have the “Run” dialogue open you need to type “regedit” then hit “Enter” or click “Ok”. Doing this will open the registry editor.

 

Once you have opened the registry editor you need to navigate to the following registry folder:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ SOFTWARE\ Microsoft\ Windows\ CurrentVersion\ Explorer\ Tips

 

Once you have navigated to this registry folder you will notice that there is a huge list of values in the right pane. To change the tips in Windows XP you need to right click on the value in the right pane and then “Modify Value”. All you have to do once you have selected “Modify Value” is edit the text to the tip you would like to display in place of the tip you are editing. Once you have replaced the original text with your desired text you need to hit the “Enter” key and then close the registry editor and then enable Windows XP tips. Now you just need to restart your computer for the new tips to take effect.

This is great for playing pranks on people or just using it for a laugh. Enjoy your newfound Windows registry knowledge.

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